Showings are one of the biggest aspects of the home-selling process. After all, it’s extremely rare that people make such a large purchase without first seeing the home in person.

But what happens after a real estate showing?

If the prospective buyer loves the house and wants to make an offer, it’s a joyous time for all involved.

If they decide the house they just viewed isn’t their dream home, however, the showing process continues – for the seller, listing agent, buyer’s agent and the prospective buyer.

The next step, and most important thing to do after a real estate showing, is to give, gather and share feedback.

Here’s how each person involved in a real estate showing should handle the feedback process.

Listing Agents

Let’s get to it right away: Getting feedback can be a challenge.

Buyer’s agents are busy, they see a lot of different homes and, quite frankly, they’re typically more worried about pleasing their client than acting as a conduit for another agent’s client.

There are several ways to request feedback: A day-of or day-after email, a phone call or even a quick conversation via text message.

The trouble with those options, however, are many. As real estate professionals know, it’s tough to get a hold of fellow agents at an opportune time, and it’s also difficult on the listing agent’s end to continue to reach out without getting a response.

Check out these five tips to increase your feedback response rate, one of which is the automated feedback module included in all ShowingTime products, which also includes the option to use Enhanced Feedback.

Among other features, both feedback options allow listing agents to automatically send feedback requests to buyer’s agents. With Enhanced Feedback, the form is customizable and can consist of a single comment box with multiple choice questions the listing agent can personalize for each listing.

Personalized questions provide the best feedback and can help shed light on where your listing stands compared to others – here are six suggested feedback questions we think every listing agent should ask.

Whichever avenue you choose, once you receive feedback, share it with your seller either automatically or after you review it (both options are available with ShowingTime).

As we’ll mention later, sometimes sellers need feedback – harsh or otherwise – to fully comprehend how their property stacks up against others on the market.

Buyer’s Agents

Part of being a good buyer’s agent is being an attentive listener.

During the initial consultation with your client, or after checking out several of the listings your client sent you that they want to see, you’ll quickly pick up on what they view as most important in their future home. Whether it’s a big yard, magnificent kitchen or large master bedroom, you likely wouldn’t waste your time showing your client listings that don’t check those boxes.

Use those same listening skills while walking through properties. After you share details and while you’re walking through, take notes about what your client is commenting on. Afterward, ask a few general questions:

  • What was your overall impression of the house?
  • What did you like?
  • What did you dislike?

Taking this approach is beneficial on a number of levels.

First, it helps you better understand what they’re looking for in a home, which will save you time in the future.

Second, taking immediate notes helps you better remember the positives and negatives of a house so you can forward your clients’ thoughts to the listing agent.

Some listing agents always request – and expect – to receive buyer feedback. Others may not. But it’s considered an industry courtesy to respond to such requests.

Be prepared either way.

Prospective Buyers

As a prospective buyer, the main goal when looking at several houses is to find your next home, so you’re not really thinking about the process from the sellers’ perspective – nor should you.

But be open and honest with your agent about what you like or don’t like about the home. There’s no reason for you to reach out to the seller – nor should they reach out to you – but tell your real estate agent why this is or isn’t the house for you.

Not only will it help the sellers, but it will also help give your agent get a better idea of what you’re looking for.

Sellers

The most important thing for sellers to remember is that you’re selling a house, not your home.

Keep that in mind when reviewing buyer feedback you receive from your listing agent. (And remember: Don’t kill the messenger!)

Take the feedback you receive to heart and, if it fits into your budget, address potential concerns about an old paint job, numerous preferences to hardwood floors over carpet and less-than-desirable landscaping.

In the end, it can help you sell your home.

And if you’re not hearing anything? Well, sometimes no feedback could be all the feedback you need.


Are you a real estate agent looking for ways to improve your feedback response rate? Learn how the ShowingTime Appointment Center can streamline the feedback and showing scheduling process so you can focus on more important tasks that help grow your business.

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